Why females leaders are not the peaceniks you might think.

Why females leaders are not the peaceniks you might think.

Featuring Andrew Gurland, Eugenia Yuan, Adrian Martinez, Deborah Teng, Paul Thornton, Jose Canseco.

The 1998 festival smash documenting fraternity culture and its rituals, you’ll understand why co-director Gurland’s second narrative feature is a gleefully jaundiced mockumentary about another icky slice-of-life, the “international matchmaking” service if you’re familiar with Frat House. The premise is simple: Filmmaker Andrew (Gurland) pays the costs of Adrian (Martinez), a Queens doorman purchasing a bride (Yuan) from Burma, in exchange for the chance to film the procedures. The young woman’s title is Lichi, and she likes puppies, when she steps from the plane, she’s modestly dressed and subordinately cowed. So needless to say Adrian, who’s a dirtbag, promptly sets her to get results cleansing the lavatory, making “chili” away from ketchup and canned beans, and shooting amateur porn in the cellar. Andrew can’t stay to see Lichi exploited, so he measures directly into save your self her. But he’s a dirtbag in their very own means, and Lichi may possibly not be this type of naГЇf most likely. It seems grim in writing, and perhaps it’s, however the movie is surprisingly droll and delightful, too. There are rollicking scenes of domestic discord – Lichi ends up to own a pig fetish and breaks the bank purchasing ceramic tchotchkes which she arranges around Andrew’s stiffly tasteful apartment – and a third-act development relating to the sound recordist’s dotty daddy (Thornton) is hilarious. The most readily useful shock is Yuan, the child of Hong Kong actress Cheng Pei-Pei. She’s got screen that is great and invests Lichi with a mixture of kitty-cat cuteness and hellcat ferocity.Continue reading